Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

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Publication(s)

Regulators as Ďagentsí: power and personality in risk regulation and a role for agent-based simulation
http://bit.ly/evaXWn
Evaluating decision-making units under uncertainty using fuzzy multi-objective nonlinear programming
http://bit.ly/2k79ATE
Regulators as agents: Modelling personality and power as evidence is brokered to support decisions on environmental risk
http://bit.ly/1bh6em7
Elicitation of Strategies in Four Variants of a Round-robin Tournament: The case of Goofspiel
http://bit.ly/2d96xWj

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Al-Khateeb, B and Kendall, G Introducing a round robin tournament into Blondie24. In Proceedings of Computational Intelligence and Games, 2009 (CIG 2009), pages 112-116, 2009.


Abstract

Evolving self-learning players has attracted a lot of research attention in recent years. Fogel's Blondie24 represents one of the successes in this field and a strong motivating factor for other scientists. In this paper evolutionary neural networks, evolved via an evolution strategy, are utilised to evolve game playing strategies for the game of checkers by introducing a league structure into the learning phase of a system based on Blondie24. We believe that this helps eliminate some of the randomness in the evolution. Thirty feed forward neural network players are played against each other, using a round robin tournament structure, for 150 generations and the best player obtained is tested against a reimplementation of Blondie24. We also test the best player against an online program, as well as two other strong programs. The results obtained are promising.


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doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1109/CIG.2009.5286487 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{ak2009, author = {B. Al-Khateeb and G. Kendall},
title = {Introducing a round robin tournament into Blondie24},
booktitle = {Proceedings of Computational Intelligence and Games, 2009 (CIG 2009)},
year = {2009},
pages = {112--116},
month = {7-10 Sept. 2009},
organization = {Milano, Italy},
abstract = {Evolving self-learning players has attracted a lot of research attention in recent years. Fogel's Blondie24 represents one of the successes in this field and a strong motivating factor for other scientists. In this paper evolutionary neural networks, evolved via an evolution strategy, are utilised to evolve game playing strategies for the game of checkers by introducing a league structure into the learning phase of a system based on Blondie24. We believe that this helps eliminate some of the randomness in the evolution. Thirty feed forward neural network players are played against each other, using a round robin tournament structure, for 150 generations and the best player obtained is tested against a reimplementation of Blondie24. We also test the best player against an online program, as well as two other strong programs. The results obtained are promising.},
doi = {10.1109/CIG.2009.5286487},
keywords = {Checkers, Blondie24, Draughts, Games, Computational Intelligence, Neural Networks, evolutionary computation},
owner = {gxk},
timestamp = {2010.12.11},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/ak2009.pdf} }