Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

Help solve Santa's logistics problems
http://bit.ly/1DXreuW
I am a member of the Automated Scheduling, Optimisation and Planning Research Group
http://bit.ly/eIQ5XC

Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

Is it possible to card count a blackjack computer?

Publication(s)

Hyper-heuristics
http://bit.ly/1a2WNWE
Optimising risk reduction: An expected utility approach for marginal risk reduction during regulatory decision making
http://bit.ly/gBihFm
Automated tile design for self-assembly conformations
http://bit.ly/h7QYiX
Chapter 4: An Investigation of Automated Planograms Using a Simulated Annealing Based Hyper-Heuristic
http://bit.ly/1cJv7H4

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Al-Khateeb, B and Kendall, G Introducing a Round Robin Tournament into Evolutionary Individual and Social Learning Checkers. In Proceedings of the Developments in E-systems Engineering (DeSE), pages 294-299, 2011.


Abstract

In recent years, much research attention has been paid to evolving self-learning game players. Fogel's Blondie24 is a demonstration of a real success in this field, inspiring many other scientists. In this paper, artificial neural networks are used as function evaluators in order to evolve game playing strategies for the game of checkers. We introduce a league structure into the learning phase of an individual and learning system based on the Blondie24 architecture. We show that this helps eliminate some of the randomness in the evolution. The best player we evolve is tested against an implementation of an evolutionary checkers program, and also against a player, which utilises the proposed round robin tournament and finally against an individual and social learning checkers program. The results are promising, suggesting many other research directions.


pdf

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doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1109/DeSE.2011.10 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

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URL

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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{ak2011b, author = {B. Al-Khateeb and G. Kendall},
title = {Introducing a Round Robin Tournament into Evolutionary Individual and Social Learning Checkers},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the Developments in E-systems Engineering (DeSE)},
year = {2011},
pages = {294--299},
month = {6-8 Dec 2011},
organization = {Sch. of Comput. Sci., Al-Anbar Univ., Ramadi, Iraq},
abstract = {In recent years, much research attention has been paid to evolving self-learning game players. Fogel's Blondie24 is a demonstration of a real success in this field, inspiring many other scientists. In this paper, artificial neural networks are used as function evaluators in order to evolve game playing strategies for the game of checkers. We introduce a league structure into the learning phase of an individual and learning system based on the Blondie24 architecture. We show that this helps eliminate some of the randomness in the evolution. The best player we evolve is tested against an implementation of an evolutionary checkers program, and also against a player, which utilises the proposed round robin tournament and finally against an individual and social learning checkers program. The results are promising, suggesting many other research directions.},
doi = {10.1109/DeSE.2011.10},
keywords = {Checkers, Blondie24, Draughts, Games, Computational Intelligence, Neural Networks, evolutionary computation},
owner = {gxk},
timestamp = {2010.12.11},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/ak2011b.pdf} }