Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

Does AI have a place in the board room?
http://bit.ly/1DXreuW
I have published a number of papers on Cutting and Packing
http://bit.ly/dQPw7T

Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

The 2009 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Games: Report

Publication(s)

Applying Simulated Annealing and the No Fit Polygon to the Nesting Problem
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED
Co-evolution of Successful Trading Strategies in A Simulated Stock Market
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED
Aircraft Landing Problem using Hybrid Differential Evolution and Simple Descent Algorithm
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED
The examination timetabling problem at Universiti Malaysia Pahang: Comparison of a constructive heuristic with an existing software solution
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Ayob, M; Malik, M.M.; Abdllah, S; Hamdan, A.R; Kendall, G and Qu, R Solving a Practical Examination Timetabling Problem: A Case Study. In Proceedings of Computational Science and Its Applictaions (ICCSA 2007), pages 611-624, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4707, 2007.


Abstract

This paper presents a Greedy-Least Saturation Degree (G-LSD) heuristic (which is an adaptation of the least saturation degree heuristic) to solve a real-world examination timetabling problem at the University Kebangsaan, Malaysia. We utilise a new objective function that was proposed in our previous work to evaluate the quality of the timetable. The objective function considers both timeslots and days in assigning exams to timeslots, where higher priority is given to minimise students having consecutive exams on the same day. The objective also tries to spread exams throughout the examination period. This heuristic has the potential to be used for the benchmark examination datasets (e.g. the Carter datasets) as well as other real world problems. Computational results are presented.


pdf

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doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1007/978-3-540-74484-9_53 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

What is a doi?: A doi (Document Object Identifier) is a unique identifier for sicientific papers (and occasionally other material). This provides direct access to the location where the original article is published using the URL http://dx.doi/org/xxxx (replacing xxx with the doi). See http://dx.doi.org/ for more information



URL

The URL for additional information is http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-74484-9

The URL is only provided if there is additional information that might be useful. For example, where the entry is a book chapter, the URL might link to the book itself.


Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{amahkq2007, author = {M. Ayob and M.M.A Malik and S. Abdllah and A.R. Hamdan and G. Kendall and R. Qu},
title = {Solving a Practical Examination Timetabling Problem: A Case Study},
booktitle = {Proceedings of Computational Science and Its Applictaions (ICCSA 2007)},
year = {2007},
editor = {O. Gervasi and M. Gavrilova},
volume = {4707},
series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
pages = {611-624},
month = {August, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia},
publisher = {Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg},
abstract = {This paper presents a Greedy-Least Saturation Degree (G-LSD) heuristic (which is an adaptation of the least saturation degree heuristic) to solve a real-world examination timetabling problem at the University Kebangsaan, Malaysia. We utilise a new objective function that was proposed in our previous work to evaluate the quality of the timetable. The objective function considers both timeslots and days in assigning exams to timeslots, where higher priority is given to minimise students having consecutive exams on the same day. The objective also tries to spread exams throughout the examination period. This heuristic has the potential to be used for the benchmark examination datasets (e.g. the Carter datasets) as well as other real world problems. Computational results are presented.},
doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-74484-9_53},
keywords = {examination timetabling, exam timetabling, meta-heuristics, heuristics, saturation degree, Carter},
owner = {est},
timestamp = {2010.03.18},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-74484-9},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/amahkq2007.pdf} }