Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

How are football fixtures worked out?
http://bit.ly/1z0oTAH
If you are interested in hyper-heuristics, take a look at my publications in this area
http://bit.ly/efxLGg

Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

What is Operations Research?

Publication(s)

A dynamic truck dispatching problem in marine container terminal
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED
Barriers to implementation of IT in educational institutions
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Aircraft Landing Problem using Hybrid Differential Evolution and Simple Descent Algorithm
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED
A Hyperheuristic Approach to Scheduling a Sales Summit
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Burke, E.K; Hyde, M.R and Kendall, G Evolving Bin Packing Heuristics with Genetic Programming. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Parallel Problem Solving from Nature (PPSN 2006), pages 860-869, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4193, 2006.


Abstract

The bin-packing problem is a well known NP-Hard optimisation problem, and, over the years, many heuristics have been developed to generate good quality solutions. This paper outlines a genetic programming system which evolves a heuristic that decides whether to put a piece in a bin when presented with the sum of the pieces already in the bin and the size of the piece that is about to be packed. This heuristic operates in a fixed framework that iterates through the open bins, applying the heuristic to each one, before deciding which bin to use. The best evolved programs emulate the functionality of the human designed ‘first-fit’ heuristic. Thus, the contribution of this paper is to demonstrate that genetic programming can be employed to automatically evolve bin packing heuristics which are the same as high quality heuristics which have been designed by humans.


pdf

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doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1007/11844297_87 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

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URL

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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{bhk2006, author = {E.K. Burke and M.R. Hyde and G. Kendall},
title = {Evolving Bin Packing Heuristics with Genetic Programming},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Parallel Problem Solving from Nature (PPSN 2006)},
year = {2006},
editor = {T.P. Runarsson and H-G. Beyer and E.K. Burke and G. Merelo Guervos and J. Juan and D. Whitley and X. Yao},
volume = {4193},
series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
pages = {860--869},
month = {September},
organization = {Reykjavik, Iceland},
abstract = {The bin-packing problem is a well known NP-Hard optimisation problem, and, over the years, many heuristics have been developed to generate good quality solutions. This paper outlines a genetic programming system which evolves a heuristic that decides whether to put a piece in a bin when presented with the sum of the pieces already in the bin and the size of the piece that is about to be packed. This heuristic operates in a fixed framework that iterates through the open bins, applying the heuristic to each one, before deciding which bin to use. The best evolved programs emulate the functionality of the human designed ‘first-fit’ heuristic. Thus, the contribution of this paper is to demonstrate that genetic programming can be employed to automatically evolve bin packing heuristics which are the same as high quality heuristics which have been designed by humans.},
doi = {10.1007/11844297_87},
keywords = {packing, evolution, hyper-heuristics, hyperheuristics, heuristics, genetic programming, bin packing},
timestamp = {2007.03.29},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/bhk2006.pdf} }