Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

Help solve Santa's logistics problems
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Help solve Santa's logistics problems
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Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

2010 Pac-Man Competition at CIG 2010

Publication(s)

An Evolutionary Approach for the Tuning of a Chess Evaluation Function using Population Dynamics
http://bit.ly/dFh029
General Video Game Playing
http://bit.ly/1a2Vjvz
Evolutionary Strategies - A New Macroeconomic Policy Tool?
http://bit.ly/gor2a0
The Cross-domain Heuristic Search Challenge - An International Research Competition
http://bit.ly/1a2VfMs

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Burke, E.K; Hellier, R; Kendall, G and Whitwell, a. G Irregular Packing using the Line and Arc No-Fit Polygon. Operations Research, 58 (4): 948-970, 2010.


Abstract

The no-fit polygon is a geometric construct that can offer faster and more efficient handling of geometry between pairs of shapes than traditional line-by-line intersection. The detection of intersections is a critical operation within the irregular two-dimensional stock-cutting problem (also known as "nesting"), which aims to place shapes onto sheets of material so that the material is utilised as efficiently as possible and the waste (or trim loss) is reduced. The problem forms an important process within many real-world manufacturing industries such as metalworking, automotive production, aerospace, clothing and conservatory manufacture, and others. If manufacturers can reduce their costs by utilising raw materials more effectively, this can directly translate into increased profit margins or greater competitiveness within the marketplace. Moreover, there are significant environmental benefits to be gained. Several methods have been proposed to calculate no-fit polygons, but most, if not all, can only operate on geometry that consists of line segments. This paper extends the orbital sliding method of calculating no-fit polygons to enable it to handle arcs and then shows the resultant no-fit polygons being utilised successfully on the two-dimensional irregular packing problem. As far as the authors are aware, this is the first time that a no-fit polygon algorithm has been able to handle arcs robustly without decomposing to their line approximations. The modification of the authors" previously published packing algorithm to utilise the proposed no-fit polygon approach yields solutions of excellent quality (including several best-known) on well-established literature benchmark problems after only a few minutes. The authors believe that the success of the packing strategy and the line and arc no-fit polygon algorithm make this approach a serious candidate for use in real-world production environments.


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doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1287/opre.1090.0770 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

What is a doi?: A doi (Document Object Identifier) is a unique identifier for sicientific papers (and occasionally other material). This provides direct access to the location where the original article is published using the URL http://dx.doi/org/xxxx (replacing xxx with the doi). See http://dx.doi.org/ for more information


Journal Rankings


ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports

The Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports (often known as ISI Impact Factors) help measure how often an article is cited. You can get an introduction to Journal Citation Reports here. Below I have provided the ISI impact factor for the jourrnal in which this article was published. For complete information I have shown the ISI ranking over a number of years, with the latest ranking highlighted.

2014 (1.743), 2013 (1.500), 2012 (1.786), 2011 (1.665), 2010 (1.995), 2009 (1.576), 2008 (1.463), 2007 (1.467), 2006 (1.234), 2005 (1.219), 2004 (0.803), 2003 (0.672), 2002 (0.892), 2001 (0.813), 2000 (1.006)

URL

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Bibtex

@ARTICLE{bhkw2010a, author = {E.K. Burke and R. Hellier and G. Kendall and and G. Whitwell},
title = {Irregular Packing using the Line and Arc No-Fit Polygon},
journal = {Operations Research},
year = {2010},
volume = {58},
pages = {948--970},
number = {4},
month = {August 2010},
abstract = {The no-fit polygon is a geometric construct that can offer faster and more efficient handling of geometry between pairs of shapes than traditional line-by-line intersection. The detection of intersections is a critical operation within the irregular two-dimensional stock-cutting problem (also known as "nesting"), which aims to place shapes onto sheets of material so that the material is utilised as efficiently as possible and the waste (or trim loss) is reduced. The problem forms an important process within many real-world manufacturing industries such as metalworking, automotive production, aerospace, clothing and conservatory manufacture, and others. If manufacturers can reduce their costs by utilising raw materials more effectively, this can directly translate into increased profit margins or greater competitiveness within the marketplace. Moreover, there are significant environmental benefits to be gained. Several methods have been proposed to calculate no-fit polygons, but most, if not all, can only operate on geometry that consists of line segments. This paper extends the orbital sliding method of calculating no-fit polygons to enable it to handle arcs and then shows the resultant no-fit polygons being utilised successfully on the two-dimensional irregular packing problem. As far as the authors are aware, this is the first time that a no-fit polygon algorithm has been able to handle arcs robustly without decomposing to their line approximations. The modification of the authors" previously published packing algorithm to utilise the proposed no-fit polygon approach yields solutions of excellent quality (including several best-known) on well-established literature benchmark problems after only a few minutes. The authors believe that the success of the packing strategy and the line and arc no-fit polygon algorithm make this approach a serious candidate for use in real-world production environments.},
doi = {10.1287/opre.1090.0770},
issn = {0030-364X},
keywords = {Packing, Nesting, Cutting, No Fit Polygon, Irregular},
owner = {est},
timestamp = {2010.02.22} }