Graham Kendall
Various Images

Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

I am the chair of the MISTA (Multidisciplinary International Conference on Scheduling: Theory and Applications)
http://bit.ly/hvZIaN
Help solve Santa's logistics problems
http://bit.ly/1DXreuW

Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

Twitter: Identifying Potential Followers

Publication(s)

Scheduling English football fixtures over holiday periods
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED
A Study of Simulated Annealing Hyperheuristics
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED
Hyperheuristics: A Robust Optimisation Method Applied to Nurse Scheduling
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED
Automated code generation by local search
RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Dror, M; Kendall, G and Rapoport, A Elicitation of Strategies in Four Variants of a Round-robin Tournament: The case of Goofspiel. IEEE Transactions on Computational Intelligence and AI in Games, 8 (3): 209-217, 2016.


Abstract

Goofspiel is a simple two-person zero-sum game for which there exist no known equilibrium strategies. To gain insight into what constitute winning strategies, we conducted a round-robin tournament in which participants were asked to provide computerized programs for playing the game with or without carryover. Each of these two variants was to be played under two quite different objective functions, namely, maximization of the cumulative number of points won across all opponents (as in Axelrod's tournament), and maximization of the probability of winning any given round. Our results show that there are, indeed, inherent differences in the results with respect to the complexity of the game and its objective function, and that winning strategies exhibit a level of sophistication, depth, and balance that are not captured by present models of adaptive learning.


pdf

You can download the pdf of this publication from here


doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1109/TCIAIG.2014.2377250 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

What is a doi?: A doi (Document Object Identifier) is a unique identifier for sicientific papers (and occasionally other material). This provides direct access to the location where the original article is published using the URL http://dx.doi/org/xxxx (replacing xxx with the doi). See http://dx.doi.org/ for more information


Journal Rankings


ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports

The Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports (often known as ISI Impact Factors) help measure how often an article is cited. You can get an introduction to Journal Citation Reports here. Below I have provided the ISI impact factor for the jourrnal in which this article was published. For complete information I have shown the ISI ranking over a number of years, with the latest ranking highlighted.

2014 (1.481), 2013 (1.167), 2012 (1.694), 2011 (1.617)

URL

This pubication does not have a URL associated with it.

The URL is only provided if there is additional information that might be useful. For example, where the entry is a book chapter, the URL might link to the book itself.


Bibtex

@ARTICLE{dkr2016, author = {M. Dror and G. Kendall and A. Rapoport},
title = {Elicitation of Strategies in Four Variants of a Round-robin Tournament: The case of Goofspiel},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Computational Intelligence and AI in Games},
year = {2016},
volume = {8},
pages = {209--217},
number = {3},
abstract = {Goofspiel is a simple two-person zero-sum game for which there exist no known equilibrium strategies. To gain insight into what constitute winning strategies, we conducted a round-robin tournament in which participants were asked to provide computerized programs for playing the game with or without carryover. Each of these two variants was to be played under two quite different objective functions, namely, maximization of the cumulative number of points won across all opponents (as in Axelrod's tournament), and maximization of the probability of winning any given round. Our results show that there are, indeed, inherent differences in the results with respect to the complexity of the game and its objective function, and that winning strategies exhibit a level of sophistication, depth, and balance that are not captured by present models of adaptive learning.},
doi = {10.1109/TCIAIG.2014.2377250},
issn = {1943-068X},
owner = {Graham},
timestamp = {2013.07.28},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/dkr2016.pdf} }