Graham Kendall
Various Images

Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

Can ants play chess? Yes they can!
http://bit.ly/1yW3UhX
The hunt for MH370
http://bit.ly/1DXRLbu

Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

Bibtex: Display papers by a given author

Publication(s)

An artificial neural network for predicting domestic hot water characteristics
http://bit.ly/dNtSFu
Population based Monte Carlo tree search hyper-heuristic for combinatorial optimization problems
http://bit.ly/1IIArdQ
Frequency analysis for dendritic cell population tuning
http://bit.ly/go1Ihk
An Investigation of a Tabu Search Based Hyper-Heuristic for Examination Timetabling
http://bit.ly/1mlqRSh

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Kendall, G; McCollum, B; Cruz, F and McMullan, P Scheduling English Football Fixtures: Consideration of Two Conflicting Objectives. In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Practice and Theory of Automated Timetabling (PATAT 2010), pages 1-15, 11-13 August 2010, Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK, 2010.


Abstract

In previous work the distance travelled by UK football clubs, and their supporters, over the Christmas/New Year period was minimised. This is important as it is not only a holiday season but, often, there is bad weather at this time of the year. Whilst searching for good quality solutions for this problem, various constraints have to be respected. One of these relates to clashes, which measures how many paired teams play at home on the same day. Whilst the supporters have an interest in minimising the distance they travel, the police also have an interest in having as few pair clashes as possible. This is due to the fact that these fixtures are more expensive, and diffcult, to police. However, these two objectives (minimise distance and minimise pair clashes) conflict with one another in that a decrease in one intuitively leads to an increase in the other. This paper explores this question and shows that there are compromise solutions which allow fewer pair clashes but does not statistically increase the distance travelled. This paper provides a more comprehensive study of the initial results presented at the previous PATAT conference. We present a more detailed set of computational experiments, along with a greater number of datasets.We conclude that it is sometimes possible to reduce the number of pair clashes whilst not significantly increasing the overall distance that is travelled.


pdf

You can download the pdf of this publication from here


doi

This publication does not have a doi, so we cannot provide a link to the original source

What is a doi?: A doi (Document Object Identifier) is a unique identifier for sicientific papers (and occasionally other material). This provides direct access to the location where the original article is published using the URL http://dx.doi/org/xxxx (replacing xxx with the doi). See http://dx.doi.org/ for more information



URL

This pubication does not have a URL associated with it.

The URL is only provided if there is additional information that might be useful. For example, where the entry is a book chapter, the URL might link to the book itself.


Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{kmcm2010, author = {G. Kendall and B. McCollum and F. Cruz and P. McMullan},
title = {Scheduling English Football Fixtures: Consideration of Two Conflicting Objectives},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Practice and Theory of Automated Timetabling (PATAT 2010)},
year = {2010},
editor = {B. McCollum and E.K. Burke},
pages = {1--15},
address = {11-13 August 2010, Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK},
abstract = {In previous work the distance travelled by UK football clubs, and their supporters, over the Christmas/New Year period was minimised. This is important as it is not only a holiday season but, often, there is bad weather at this time of the year. Whilst searching for good quality solutions for this problem, various constraints have to be respected. One of these relates to clashes, which measures how many paired teams play at home on the same day. Whilst the supporters have an interest in minimising the distance they travel, the police also have an interest in having as few pair clashes as possible. This is due to the fact that these fixtures are more expensive, and diffcult, to police. However, these two objectives (minimise distance and minimise pair clashes) conflict with one another in that a decrease in one intuitively leads to an increase in the other. This paper explores this question and shows that there are compromise solutions which allow fewer pair clashes but does not statistically increase the distance travelled. This paper provides a more comprehensive study of the initial results presented at the previous PATAT conference. We present a more detailed set of computational experiments, along with a greater number of datasets.We conclude that it is sometimes possible to reduce the number of pair clashes whilst not significantly increasing the overall distance that is travelled.},
keywords = {Football, Soccer, Scheduling, Sports, Multi-objective, multiobjective},
owner = {gxk},
timestamp = {2010.12.10},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/kmcm2010.pdf} }