Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

How to teach Deep Blue to play poker and deliver groceries
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Help solve Santa's logistics problems
http://bit.ly/1DXreuW

Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

Can Forecasters Forecast Successfully?: Evidence from UK Betting Markets

Publication(s)

Towards the 'Decathlon 'Challenge' of search heuristics
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Making Airline Schedules More Robust
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Evolving Neural Networks with Evolutionary Strategies: A New Application to Divisa Money
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Scheduling TV Commercials: Models and Solution Methodologies
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Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Kendall, G; Yaakob, R and Hingston, P An Investigation of an Evolutionary Approach to the Opening of Go. In Proceedings of the 2004 IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation (CEC'04), pages 2052-2059, Portland, Oregon, 2004.


Abstract

The game of Go can be divided into three stages; the opening, the middle, and the end game. In this paper, evolutionary neural networks, evolved via an evolutionary strategy, are used to develop opening game playing strategies for the game. Go is typically played on one of three different board sizes, i.e., 9x9, 13x13 and 19x19. A 19x19 board is the standard size for tournament play but 9x9 and 13x13 boards are usually used by less-experienced players or for faster games. This paper focuses on the opening, using a 13x13 board. A feed forward neural network player is played against a static player (Gondo), for the first 30 moves. Then Gondo takes the part of both players to play out the remainder of the game. Two experiments are presented which indicate that learning is taking place.


pdf

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doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1109/CEC.2004.1331149 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{kyh2004, author = {G. Kendall and R. Yaakob and P. Hingston},
title = {An Investigation of an Evolutionary Approach to the Opening of Go},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2004 IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation (CEC'04)},
year = {2004},
pages = {2052--2059},
address = {Portland, Oregon},
month = {20-23 June},
abstract = {The game of Go can be divided into three stages; the opening, the middle, and the end game. In this paper, evolutionary neural networks, evolved via an evolutionary strategy, are used to develop opening game playing strategies for the game. Go is typically played on one of three different board sizes, i.e., 9x9, 13x13 and 19x19. A 19x19 board is the standard size for tournament play but 9x9 and 13x13 boards are usually used by less-experienced players or for faster games. This paper focuses on the opening, using a 13x13 board. A feed forward neural network player is played against a static player (Gondo), for the first 30 moves. Then Gondo takes the part of both players to play out the remainder of the game. Two experiments are presented which indicate that learning is taking place.},
comment = {ISBN 0-7803-8515-2},
doi = {10.1109/CEC.2004.1331149},
keywords = {Go, evolution, artificial neural networks, evolution strategy},
timestamp = {2007.03.29},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/kyh2004.pdf} }