Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

I have published some papers on timetabling.
http://bit.ly/hSGAhZ
Can ants play chess? Yes they can!
http://bit.ly/1yW3UhX

Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

Improving/targeting my Twitter Feed

Publication(s)

A nozzle selection heuristic to optimise the hybrid pick and place machine
http://bit.ly/eAjsEX
Complete and robust no-fit polygon generation for the irregular stock cutting problem
http://bit.ly/fwKSfE
The effect of memory size on the evolutionary stability of strategies in iterated prisoner's dilemma
http://bit.ly/1HXMzXa
Ant Colonies Discover Knight's Tours
http://bit.ly/h0DqWF

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Li, J; Davies, G.D; Kendall, G; Soane, E; Bai, R; Rocks, S.A and Pollard, S.J.T Evidence and belief in regulatory decisions Incorporating expected utility into decision modelling. Expert Systems with Applications, 39 (10): 8604-8610, 2012.


Abstract

Recent changes in the assessment and management of risks has had the effect that greater importance has been placed on relationships between individuals and within groups to inform decision making. In this paper, we provide the theoretical underpinning for an expected utility approach to decision-making. The approach, which is presented using established evidence support logic (TESLA), integrating the expected utilities in the forming of group decisions. The rationale and basis are described and illustrated through a hypothetical decision context of options for the disposal of animal carcasses that accumulate during disease outbreaks. The approach forms the basis for exploring the richness of risk-based decisions, and representing individual beliefs about the sufficiency of evidence they may advance in support of hypotheses.


pdf

You can download the pdf of this publication from here


doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1016/j.eswa.2012.01.193 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

What is a doi?: A doi (Document Object Identifier) is a unique identifier for sicientific papers (and occasionally other material). This provides direct access to the location where the original article is published using the URL http://dx.doi/org/xxxx (replacing xxx with the doi). See http://dx.doi.org/ for more information


Journal Rankings


ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports

The Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports (often known as ISI Impact Factors) help measure how often an article is cited. You can get an introduction to Journal Citation Reports here. Below I have provided the ISI impact factor for the jourrnal in which this article was published. For complete information I have shown the ISI ranking over a number of years, with the latest ranking highlighted.

2014 (2.240), 2013 (1.965), 2012 (1.854), 2011 (2.203), 2010 (1.926), 2009 (2.908), 2008 (2.596), 2007 (1.177), 2006 (0.957), 2005 (1.236), 2004 (1.247), 2003 (1.067), 2002 (0.786), 2001 (0.321), 2000 (0.405)

URL

This pubication does not have a URL associated with it.

The URL is only provided if there is additional information that might be useful. For example, where the entry is a book chapter, the URL might link to the book itself.


Bibtex

@ARTICLE{ldksbrp2012, author = {J. Li and G.D. Davies and G. Kendall and E. Soane and R. Bai and S.A. Rocks and S.J.T. Pollard},
title = {Evidence and belief in regulatory decisions Incorporating expected utility into decision modelling},
journal = {Expert Systems with Applications},
year = {2012},
volume = {39},
pages = {8604--8610},
number = {10},
abstract = {Recent changes in the assessment and management of risks has had the effect that greater importance has been placed on relationships between individuals and within groups to inform decision making. In this paper, we provide the theoretical underpinning for an expected utility approach to decision-making. The approach, which is presented using established evidence support logic (TESLA), integrating the expected utilities in the forming of group decisions. The rationale and basis are described and illustrated through a hypothetical decision context of options for the disposal of animal carcasses that accumulate during disease outbreaks. The approach forms the basis for exploring the richness of risk-based decisions, and representing individual beliefs about the sufficiency of evidence they may advance in support of hypotheses.},
doi = {10.1016/j.eswa.2012.01.193},
issn = {0957-4174},
keywords = {Risk, Regulation, Decision Making, TESLA},
owner = {gxk},
timestamp = {2010.10.12},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/ldksbrp2012.pdf} }