Graham Kendall
Various Images

Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

I am the chair of the MISTA (Multidisciplinary International Conference on Scheduling: Theory and Applications)
http://bit.ly/hvZIaN
I am a member of the Automated Scheduling, Optimisation and Planning Research Group
http://bit.ly/eIQ5XC

Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

Can Artificial Intelligence be used in the Board Room?

Publication(s)

Scripting the Game of Lemmings with a Genetic Algorithm
http://bit.ly/g0igy0
An Investigation of an Evolutionary Approach to the Opening of Go
http://bit.ly/dIVT5J
Automatic Design of Hyper-heuristic Framework with Gene Expression Programming for Combinatorial Optimization problems
http://bit.ly/1L6OJ8g
Evolving Neural Networks with Evolutionary Strategies: A New Application to Divisa Money
http://bit.ly/dKzEAy

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Li, J and Kendall, G On Nash equilibrium and evolutionarily stable states that are not characterised by the folk theorem. PLoS ONE, 10 (8): e0136032, 2015.

ISSN: 1932-6203


Abstract

In evolutionary game theory, evolutionarily stable states are characterised by the folk theorem because exact solutions to the replicator equation are difficult to obtain. It is generally assumed that the folk theorem, which is the fundamental theory for non-cooperative games, defines all Nash equilibria in infinitely repeated games. Here, we prove that Nash equilibria that are not characterised by the folk theorem do exist. By adopting specific reactive strategies, a group of players can be better off by coordinating their actions in repeated games. We call it a type-k equilibrium when a group of k players coordinate their actions and they have no incentive to deviate from their strategies simultaneously. The existence and stability of the type-k equilibrium in general games is discussed. This study shows that the sets of Nash equilibria and evolutionarily stable states have greater cardinality than classic game theory has predicted in many repeated games.


pdf

You can download the pdf of this publication from here


doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1371/journal.pone.0136032 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

What is a doi?: A doi (Document Object Identifier) is a unique identifier for sicientific papers (and occasionally other material). This provides direct access to the location where the original article is published using the URL http://dx.doi/org/xxxx (replacing xxx with the doi). See http://dx.doi.org/ for more information


Journal Rankings


ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports

The Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports (often known as ISI Impact Factors) help measure how often an article is cited. You can get an introduction to Journal Citation Reports here. Below I have provided the ISI impact factor for the jourrnal in which this article was published. For complete information I have shown the ISI ranking over a number of years, with the latest ranking highlighted.

2014 (3.234), 2013 (3.534), 2012 (3.730), 2011 (4.092), 2010 (4.411), 2009 (4.351)

URL

This pubication does not have a URL associated with it.

The URL is only provided if there is additional information that might be useful. For example, where the entry is a book chapter, the URL might link to the book itself.


Bibtex

@ARTICLE{lk2015, author = {J. Li and G. Kendall},
title = {On Nash equilibrium and evolutionarily stable states that are not characterised by the folk theorem},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
year = {2015},
volume = {10},
pages = {e0136032},
number = {8},
note = {ISSN: 1932-6203},
abstract = {In evolutionary game theory, evolutionarily stable states are characterised by the folk theorem because exact solutions to the replicator equation are difficult to obtain. It is generally assumed that the folk theorem, which is the fundamental theory for non-cooperative games, defines all Nash equilibria in infinitely repeated games. Here, we prove that Nash equilibria that are not characterised by the folk theorem do exist. By adopting specific reactive strategies, a group of players can be better off by coordinating their actions in repeated games. We call it a type-k equilibrium when a group of k players coordinate their actions and they have no incentive to deviate from their strategies simultaneously. The existence and stability of the type-k equilibrium in general games is discussed. This study shows that the sets of Nash equilibria and evolutionarily stable states have greater cardinality than classic game theory has predicted in many repeated games.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0136032},
issn = {1932-6203},
owner = {gxk},
timestamp = {2011.06.11},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/lk2015.pdf} }