Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

I am involved with a spin out company that specialises in Strategic Resource Planning
http://bit.ly/eTPZO2
How are football fixtures worked out?
http://bit.ly/1z0oTAH

Latest Blog Post

How Isaac Newton could help you beat the casino at roulette

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Some of the Challenges in Parsing Bibtex Authors

Publication(s)

A Hybrid Evolutionary Approach to the Nurse Rostering Problem
http://bit.ly/ey147Y
The evolution of blackjack strategies
http://bit.ly/gdKjUc
Chapter 2: Iterated prisoner's dilemma and evolutionary game theory
http://bit.ly/1dhTcRf
An Investigation of an Evolutionary Approach to the Opening of Go
http://bit.ly/dIVT5J

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Moody, D; Kendall, G and Bar-Noy, A Youth Sports Leagues Scheduling. In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Practice and Theory of Automated Timetabling (PATAT 2010), pages 283-293, 11-13 August 2010, Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK, 2010.


Abstract

There is no abstract to this paper, so the following are the opening paragraphs. Youth sports are administered by governing bodies that determine sportsmanship rules, promote the sport, and organize youth participation. Organizations within these bodies may be towns, high schools, sports clubs with international affiliations (e.g., FIFA -Federation International de Football Federation), and religious groups. Each of the organizations sponsor teams in leagues, and provides a venue or fixture. For example youth leagues in the United States include: junior soccer leagues, Little League baseball, inter-scholastic high school basketball, and the Catholic Youth organization (CYO). Youth sports leagues are played worldwide. For example, Little League Baseball is played in 72 countries worldwide within 7,170 leagues, comprising over 2 million players. A Youth Sports League (YSL) consists of divisions (see Appendix A for terms we use in this paper), which are sets of teams grouped by age, gender, and/or level of play. The number of teams in a division can vary, ranging from 4 to 20 teams. Each participant registers with the league to play the same number of games, regardless of division. The schedule for a division is often a round robin tournament followed by additional games against selected opponents from the division in order to meet each team’s required number of games. This type of schedule is referred to as “unbalanced” since a team may play one opponent once more than another. The sharing of the organization’s venue by its sponsored teams creates a dependency between the division schedules. Two of an organization’s teams, possibly from different divisions, cannot host a game at the same time. Hence, the administrator must consider the schedule of all divisions, when creating the master league schedule.The scheduling of youth sports leagues differs from the professional sports league problem, widely studied in scheduling literature and surveyed by Kendall et al. [6]. Professional sports involve a balanced schedule, with guaranteed availability of the venue. Youth sports leagues play unbalanced schedules, and teams from all divisions must share a venue. A YSL venue can support several games a day, whereas professional sports teams’ venues typically only host one game in a day. This venue sharing creates a schedule dependency among all divisions. A professional league with 4 divisions comprising 12 teams, can be viewed as four separate and distinct round-robin tournaments. The same league structure in the YSL must be viewed as one schedule with 48 teams playing an unbalanced schedule. Real world instances of youth sports can include 400 divisions involving 3500 teams, for example the Long Island CYO youth basketball.


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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{mkb2010b, author = {D. Moody and G. Kendall and A. Bar-Noy},
title = {Youth Sports Leagues Scheduling},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Practice and Theory of Automated Timetabling (PATAT 2010)},
year = {2010},
editor = {B. McCollum and E.K. Burke},
pages = {283--293},
address = {11-13 August 2010, Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK},
abstract = {There is no abstract to this paper, so the following are the opening paragraphs. Youth sports are administered by governing bodies that determine sportsmanship rules, promote the sport, and organize youth participation. Organizations within these bodies may be towns, high schools, sports clubs with international affiliations (e.g., FIFA -Federation International de Football Federation), and religious groups. Each of the organizations sponsor teams in leagues, and provides a venue or fixture. For example youth leagues in the United States include: junior soccer leagues, Little League baseball, inter-scholastic high school basketball, and the Catholic Youth organization (CYO). Youth sports leagues are played worldwide. For example, Little League Baseball is played in 72 countries worldwide within 7,170 leagues, comprising over 2 million players. A Youth Sports League (YSL) consists of divisions (see Appendix A for terms we use in this paper), which are sets of teams grouped by age, gender, and/or level of play. The number of teams in a division can vary, ranging from 4 to 20 teams. Each participant registers with the league to play the same number of games, regardless of division. The schedule for a division is often a round robin tournament followed by additional games against selected opponents from the division in order to meet each team’s required number of games. This type of schedule is referred to as “unbalanced” since a team may play one opponent once more than another. The sharing of the organization’s venue by its sponsored teams creates a dependency between the division schedules. Two of an organization’s teams, possibly from different divisions, cannot host a game at the same time. Hence, the administrator must consider the schedule of all divisions, when creating the master league schedule.The scheduling of youth sports leagues differs from the professional sports league problem, widely studied in scheduling literature and surveyed by Kendall et al. [6]. Professional sports involve a balanced schedule, with guaranteed availability of the venue. Youth sports leagues play unbalanced schedules, and teams from all divisions must share a venue. A YSL venue can support several games a day, whereas professional sports teams’ venues typically only host one game in a day. This venue sharing creates a schedule dependency among all divisions. A professional league with 4 divisions comprising 12 teams, can be viewed as four separate and distinct round-robin tournaments. The same league structure in the YSL must be viewed as one schedule with 48 teams playing an unbalanced schedule. Real world instances of youth sports can include 400 divisions involving 3500 teams, for example the Long Island CYO youth basketball.},
keywords = {Football, Soccer, Scheduling, Sports, Youth League},
owner = {gxk},
timestamp = {2010.12.10},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/mkb2010b.pdf} }