Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

Help solve Santa's logistics problems
http://bit.ly/1DXreuW
I am a member of the Automated Scheduling, Optimisation and Planning Research Group
http://bit.ly/eIQ5XC

Latest Blog Post

How Isaac Newton could help you beat the casino at roulette

Random Blog Post

Wildcards and Carriage Returns in Word

Publication(s)

Investigation of an Adaptive Cribbage Player
http://bit.ly/eVPybN
Mobile Games with Intelligence: a Killer Application?
http://bit.ly/1dhSrHP
Studying the Effect that a Linear Transformation has on the Time-Series Prediction Ability of an Evolutionary Neural Network
http://bit.ly/eyLaq2
On Nie-Tan operator and type-reduction of interval type-2 fuzzy sets
http://bit.ly/2kqxtD3

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Ryckbosch, F; Berghe, G. V. and Kendall, G A Heuristic Approach for the Travelling Tournament Problem using Optimal Travelling Salesman Tours. In Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on the Practice and Theory of Automated Timetabling (PATAT 2008), 2008.

This was published in the proceedings as an abstract (not a full paper)


Abstract

The travelling tournament problem (TTP) was introduced as a challenging sports timetabling problem (Easton et al., 2001). Its objective is to minimise the total distance travelled in a double round robin tournament. A solution must satisfy the following constraints: home and away games between two teams should not be scheduled on consecutive game days, and teams should not play more than three consecutive home/away games. Test data and results are presented on the TTP website4. In this abstract, we present the results of a metaheuristic approach for the NL instances of the TTP website. The algorithm consists of a constructive and an improvement heuristic. Many examples of successful constructive heuristics have been reported, including; 1 Factorization (Di Gaspero and Schaerf, 2007); the Polygon Method (Biajoli and Lorena, 2006), (Ribeiro and Urrutia, 2004) and Tiling (Bar-Noy and Moody, 2006), (Kendall et al., 2006). The first phase of the metaheuristic builds upon the tiling approach of (Kendall et al., 2006), as it explicitly addresses the problem of minimising the travelling distance. It assigns as many tiles as possible to an initially empty schedule, after which a metaheuristic algorithm turns the schedule into a feasible solution.


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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{rvk2008, author = {F. Ryckbosch and G. Vanden Berghe and G. Kendall},
title = {A Heuristic Approach for the Travelling Tournament Problem using Optimal Travelling Salesman Tours},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on the Practice and Theory of Automated Timetabling (PATAT 2008)},
year = {2008},
editor = {E.K. Burke and M. Gendreau},
month = {18-22 August 2008, Montreal, Canada},
note = {This was published in the proceedings as an abstract (not a full paper)},
abstract = {The travelling tournament problem (TTP) was introduced as a challenging sports timetabling problem (Easton et al., 2001). Its objective is to minimise the total distance travelled in a double round robin tournament. A solution must satisfy the following constraints: home and away games between two teams should not be scheduled on consecutive game days, and teams should not play more than three consecutive home/away games. Test data and results are presented on the TTP website4. In this abstract, we present the results of a metaheuristic approach for the NL instances of the TTP website. The algorithm consists of a constructive and an improvement heuristic. Many examples of successful constructive heuristics have been reported, including; 1 Factorization (Di Gaspero and Schaerf, 2007); the Polygon Method (Biajoli and Lorena, 2006), (Ribeiro and Urrutia, 2004) and Tiling (Bar-Noy and Moody, 2006), (Kendall et al., 2006). The first phase of the metaheuristic builds upon the tiling approach of (Kendall et al., 2006), as it explicitly addresses the problem of minimising the travelling distance. It assigns as many tiles as possible to an initially empty schedule, after which a metaheuristic algorithm turns the schedule into a feasible solution.},
keywords = {TTP, Travelling Rournament Problem, TSP, Travelling Salesman Problem},
owner = {gxk},
timestamp = {2011.01.28},
webpdf = {http://www.graham-kendall.com/papers/rvk2008.pdf} }