Graham Kendall
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Professor Graham Kendall

Professor Graham Kendall is the Provost and CEO of The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). He is also a Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Nottingham.

He is a Director of MyResearch Sdn Bhd, Crops for the Future Sdn Bhd. and Nottingham Green Technologies Sdn Bhd. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS) and a Fellow of the Operational Research Society (FORS).

He has published over 230 peer reviewed papers. He is an Associate Editor of 10 journals and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

News

Can ants play chess? Yes they can!
http://bit.ly/1yW3UhX
I have published some papers on timetabling.
http://bit.ly/hSGAhZ

Latest Blog Post

Snooker: Celebrating 40 years at the Crucible

Random Blog Post

Transportation & Logistics: Dissertation Prize 2013

Publication(s)

Hybrid Heuristic for Multi-carrier Transportation Plans
http://bit.ly/1dGGwqO
A Tabu Search Approach for Graph-Structured Case Retrieval
http://bit.ly/hLtUDZ
The Scalability of Evolved On Line Bin Packing Heuristics
http://bit.ly/eVBJTd
Hyper-heuristics: a survey of the state of the art
http://bit.ly/1eSDAeb

Graham Kendall: Details of Requested Publication


Citation

Ward, C.R; Gobet, F and Kendall, G Evolving Collective Behavior in an Artificial Ecology. Artificial Life, 7 (2): 191-209, 2001.


Abstract

Collective behavior refers to coordinated group motion, common to many animals. The dynamics of a group can be seen as a distributed model, each “animal” applying the same rule set. This study investigates the use of evolved sensory controllers to produce schooling behavior. A set of artificial creatures “live” in an artificial world with hazards and food. Each creature has a simple artificial neural network brain that controls movement in different situations. A chromosome encodes the network structure and weights, which may be combined using artificial evolution with another chromosome, if a creature should choose to mate. Prey and predators coevolve without an explicit fitness function for schooling to produce sophisticated, nondeterministic, behavior. The work highlights the role of species' physiology in understanding behavior and the role of the environment in encouraging the development of sensory systems.


pdf

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doi

The doi for this publication is 10.1162/106454601753139005 You can link directly to the original paper, via the doi, from here

What is a doi?: A doi (Document Object Identifier) is a unique identifier for sicientific papers (and occasionally other material). This provides direct access to the location where the original article is published using the URL http://dx.doi/org/xxxx (replacing xxx with the doi). See http://dx.doi.org/ for more information


Journal Rankings


ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports

The Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports (often known as ISI Impact Factors) help measure how often an article is cited. You can get an introduction to Journal Citation Reports here. Below I have provided the ISI impact factor for the jourrnal in which this article was published. For complete information I have shown the ISI ranking over a number of years, with the latest ranking highlighted.

2014 (1.386), 2013 (1.930), 2012 (1.585), 2011 (2.282), 2010 (2.122), 2009 (1.960), 2008 (1.164), 2007 (1.644), 2006 (1.769), 2005 (1.857), 2004 (2.150), 2003 (3.167), 2002 (1.526), 2001 (1.306), 2000 (2.541)

URL

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The URL is only provided if there is additional information that might be useful. For example, where the entry is a book chapter, the URL might link to the book itself.


Bibtex

@ARTICLE{wgk2001, author = {C.R. Ward and F. Gobet and G. Kendall},
title = {Evolving Collective Behavior in an Artificial Ecology},
journal = {Artificial Life},
year = {2001},
volume = {7},
pages = {191--209},
number = {2},
abstract = {Collective behavior refers to coordinated group motion, common to many animals. The dynamics of a group can be seen as a distributed model, each “animal” applying the same rule set. This study investigates the use of evolved sensory controllers to produce schooling behavior. A set of artificial creatures “live” in an artificial world with hazards and food. Each creature has a simple artificial neural network brain that controls movement in different situations. A chromosome encodes the network structure and weights, which may be combined using artificial evolution with another chromosome, if a creature should choose to mate. Prey and predators coevolve without an explicit fitness function for schooling to produce sophisticated, nondeterministic, behavior. The work highlights the role of species' physiology in understanding behavior and the role of the environment in encouraging the development of sensory systems.},
doi = {10.1162/106454601753139005},
issn = {1064-5462},
keywords = {Collective behavior, flocking, group dynamics, neural network} }